Tesla Model 3: What you need to know

Tesla Model 3: What you need to know

Tesla Model 3 has been billed as Elon Musk’s lynchpin to rid the traffic of noxious fumes. In comparison to Model S and Model X, Model 3 is smaller and comes at almost half the price of model S. At the moment, Tesla is having sleepless nights trying to churn out around 500,000 units every year. There are around half-a-million paid reservations for Model 3, even as Musk tries to ramp up production.

The Model 3 Options

It seems that the range of options for model 3 keeps changing, and it can sometimes be hard to keep up. At the moment, there are two options: the entry-level, featuring rear-wheel drive, single motor, and a range of 260 miles. The single motor car used to come with a long-range battery, but that is now in the past. The entry-level Model boasts 5.6sec 0-60mph.

The second option is the all-wheel-drive dual-motor car with a better battery range. It can manage up to 310 miles between recharges. The performance version that will take you back an additional $11000 has an impressive 3.3sec 0-60mph time. It has uprated brakes and a top speed of 155mph.

Driving Tesla Model 3

The undoubtedly affordable single motor model 3, boasting an instant torque, accelerates in the same way as the Mercedes C-Class. But that is nothing compared to the performance of the dual motor car. The speeds are astonishing, for lack of better words.

Even though Model 3 offers three steering wheel options, there isn’t much difference as the vehicle feels tight, stable and a single unit. The center of gravity is much lower, and that somehow makes for a stable and fun ride. Model 3 is smoother on corners compared to its brother, Model S, and you can resist the temptation of shifting your foot to the brake pedal. Is it worth it? Well, you be the judge!

Tesla Model 3 and Autonomous Driving

Tesla Model 3 and Autonomous Driving

The debate on driverless cars has quickly moved to whether they can become a reality to when they will be available. The tech allows cities and transportation to be organized in an entirely new and revolutionary way. Companies like Google, Apple, and Tesla are in the race to develop automatic driving systems.

The main problem is that AI still has challenges solving real-life situations such as navigating the traffic with a high level of reliability and precision. There is a need for significant training data to teach the system good driving habits. Another challenge is that machine learning systems may not be proficient in handling vast amounts of data.

The same case applies with very little data. Admittedly, collecting data to use in self-driving systems is not cheap. Furthermore, many events such as witnessing an accident and encountering a particular type of debris are rare, and the car can be out of its depth. However, Waymo cars have indicated some progress, even though it’s little.

Tesla Model 3 as a Driverless Car

No doubt, Tesla Model 3 is subject to many headlines discussing its quality ride. But part of the appeal is its connectivity and self-driving tech. It comes equipped with the necessary tech such as cameras, sensors, and the autopilot system that retails at a whopping $5000. But the autopilot is not a system that converts model 3 into a fully autonomous car.

Even with the driving automation on, you as the driver will still need to be actively engaged. NTSB says that the system does not incorporate safeguards to limit its use to the conditions in which the autopilot was designed. There is still some legwork needed to achieve a fully driverless car.

According to the president of AEye, Blair LaCorte, The industry has spent up to $100 billion In the past half-decade developing driverless cars. The Silicon Valley expert estimates that a fully autonomous vehicle is about three years away, maybe sooner.

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